header

Hours of Operation: Monday to Thursday 9:00am - 5:00pm, Friday 9:00am - 4:00pm

FAQ

When should you see a physiotherapist?
Is physiotherapy covered by OHIP?
What extended health care coverage is available?
What is Female Incontinence?
What causes Female Incontinence?
What treatments are available for Female Incontinence and Pelvic Pain?
What steps should I take if I think I might be suffering from Female Incontinence?
Do you have a question for the Physiotherapist?

line

When should you see a physiotherapist?
You should see a physiotherapist when you are unable to do a physical activity that you were able to do previous to an injury, aging or disease process. Contrary to popular belief, you do not need a doctor's referral to see a physiotherapist.

Many people are surprised to know that physiotherapists can help you with incontinence or pelvic pain by using muscle strengthening relaxation techniques, biofeedback and electrical stimulation. Physiogenics provides this care by a physiotherapist with pelvic floor training.

line

Is physiotherapy covered by OHIP?

Unfortunately, the physiotherapy treatment for incontinence and pelvic pain is not covered by OHIP.

line

What extended health care coverage is available?
Most extended EHP or extended health care plans offered by employers cover physiotherapy treatment.You should contact your work health insurance group to see if they cover physiotherapy and if there is a time limit.

line

What is Female Incontinence?
Incontinence is the involuntary release of urine at the wrong time or place. Laughing, sneezing, coughing and physical activity are all part of life but loss of bladder control doesn't have to be. Twenty-five percent of middle age women suffer from Incontinence.

line

What causes Female Incontinence?

Stress Incontinence
Stress incontinence is the involuntary leakage of small amounts of urine in response to increased intra-abdominal stomach pressure. Incontinence can occur when you sneeze, cough, laugh, or lift heavy objects. Stress incontinence is seen predominantly in women. It results from either weakened support of the pelvic floor muscles and other pelvic structures or sphincter weakness/damage. Typically, this type of incontinence occurs in women in whom childbirth stretched and weakened the pelvic floor muscles.

Urge Incontinence
Urge incontinence is the leakage of larger amounts of urine that occurs when a person is not able to reach the toilet after the urge to void is perceived. This type of incontinence is part of the diagnosis of overactive bladder. Urge incontinence can also occur when one strains to release urine and still maintains urinary retention. This type of incontinence is the most common (60-70%) pattern of incontinence in the older person.

Mixed Incontinence
Mixed Incontinence is a combination of the symptoms listed above.

line

What treatments are available for Female Incontinence and Pelvic Pain?
Physiogenics will tailor a continence restoration program or a pelvic pain program specific to your type of condition. Some therapy treatments performed may include:

Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation
Beyond Kegel exercises, the focus is on pelvic floor muscle
strengthening and awareness as part of a bladder retraining program aimed at improving bladder control in women who experience Urge and Stress Incontinence and improving relaxation for pelvic pain.

Biofeedback
This treatment is used as an adjunct to pelvic floor exercises for symptoms of Stress and /or Urge Incontinence. It requires the use of electronic equipment to provide the patient with visual feedback about how the pelvic floor muscles are working - and improving. In pelvic Pain patients Biofeedback is used to promote relaxation. Biofeedback is administered by a physiotherapist with special training.

Electrical Stimulation is used in the treatment of both Stress and Urge Incontinence. The stimulation is delivered by a small battery-powered unit which applies an electric current to the muscles around the bladder to encourage better understanding about how to exercise correctly. IN Pelvic Pain patients electrical stimulation is used for desensitization and relaxation.

line

What steps should I take if I think I might be suffering from Female Incontinence?
If you think you may suffer from incontinence, speak with your family doctor and ask him / her about the benefits of physical therapy to your condition. Your doctor might need to refer you to a Urologist or Gynecologist to confirm your condition and recommend treatment. With a doctors approval, Physiogenics can start you on a plan to recovery right away. Some patients can be completely cured, while others will improve significantly.

line

Do you have a question for the Physiotherapist? Ask it here!

Your Name:

City:

Province:

What is your question?

Thank you for your question. A response will be sent out to you within one business day.

line

 
 

Home |Services | Female Incontinence | Our Team | Directions | FAQ |
Links |
Contact Us
| Privacy Policy